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20121202
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. is the situation still tense there in cairo? what about in other egyptian cities? >> no, in cairo it is relatively calm. a bigger group of protesters have come from various marches back to the presidential palace. the muslim brothers completely withdrew from the area. there was an announcement by their leader in the afternoon calling his people back, and a few hours later, the base was completely empty. it is again filled by the opposition, who are standing there asking for the president basically to resign. >> morsi is supposed to speak tonight. there has been a lot of back- and-forth over weather he will speak. what is happening there? >> lots of back and forth. they are saying that soon there will be a speech by the president. we are still waiting. it is difficult to say what he is going to say, but most likely, he will try to calm the situation, though for half of the population, he is part of the problem. he will trouble with -- he will probably try to create some kind of national dialogue, may be four -- maybe for compromise along this national draft. the opposition is also not moving an inc
in front of the presidential palace in the north of the city. there was a short outbreak of violence when people removed the police lines and then moved towards the walls of the presidential palace. now, it is basically peaceful and calm. >> what does all this mean for the future of egypt? where is all this heading? them of the muslim brothers and sell a fist to demonstrated today. it is the day of the opposition. also, we have strikes at the newspapers. every day, somebody else is demonstrating, which also shows the deep rift of the egyptian society. nobody seems to have a way out of this constitutional crisis. in supposedly two weeks, we have to vote in a referendum, yes or no, but many people today said they do not want to vote yes or no. they want the whole referendum to fall down. >> thanks very much for that. >> it has been a very big day for germany's christian democrats. the party put on a show of complete unity as they reelected angela merkel as the party leader. she will now stand in national elections at the end of next year. after being renamed cdu chairwoman, delegates stood
's story. >> reporter: people in the city mark the 40th anniversary of normalizing diplomatic ties between japan and china. he remained in the city where he lived for 50 years. a china couple adopted and raised the japanese youngster. as an adult he worked for a railway company and eventually he became station master. >> translator: i couldn't have survived after the war if my foster parents hadn't taken me in and given me such good care. they were so kind. >> reporter: but watanabe never forgot japan. looking at the picture of mount fuji always pulled at his heart strings. before he moved to china he could see it from his house. so pictures of mountains also surge memories of home. finally, he was able to set foot on the land of his birth in 1988, watanabe visited japan with others displaced by the war. he hoped to reunite with his family. but with so little information about his parents, watanabe couldn't find them. even so he chose to return to japan for good. he and his chinese wife decided to live where his guarantor lived. watanabe was 53 at the time. but settling into japan was not
in cities across the continent. >> they say the decision to split the play across europe is to celebrate the competition's 60th anniversary. >> european football fans can look forward to a party that spans the continent. the idea came from and 1980's football legend. he first proposed a multi-city championship at the end of euro 2012. now, the body's executive board has agreed. >> the main point is we need to give more cities, more countries the possibility to host a celebration, european championship, to the whole of europe. >> it is not yet clear which countries will host the matches. the bidding process is set to start early next year. cities in 13 countries are said to be in the running with berlin one of the contenders. the german football association says the announcement is absolutely positive. berlin fans can only hope that the party will touch down in their city as well. >> we will be back in one minute. we're going to take a closer look at the dramatic battle happening for the national elections in romania. >> we will take a look at some spectacular images of our planet earth.
major cities have to weed through the crowds in the morning rush hour. kim does that in seoul every day. he gets on the subway with a chart weighing 50 kilograms. he's 73 years old. kim earns around $600 a month delivering parcels all over the city. >> translator: this job means a lot to me financially. i will have to find another one if i lose it. >> reporter: elderly who live in urban centers provide a lot of similar services. they say they're happy just to have a job. south korea introduced the public pension system 13 years ago. people who paid into it for at least ten years receive a pension. but just under a third of the population age 65 and above have managed to contribute. they earn an average of about $275, but most have to keep working. some elderly live in rural areas and are pushed to their limits. this is the intensive care unit for people struggling with pesticide abuse. it launched last year in response to growing elderly patients trying to end their lives by drinking the poison. doctors say 95% of the patients arrive after attempting suicide. >> translator: it used to b
people died in the city of new bataan when a flash flood hit an emergency shelter. the storm has weakened, but the search continues for the hundreds of people still missing. the amount we will take a look at what the european commission is doing to fight -- >> we will take a look at what the european commission is doing to fight youth unemployment. >> foreign ministers have been meeting in brussels to discuss the withdrawal of troops from afghan. at issue is how the training and employment of local security forces is to be funded. all nato troops are set to be pulled out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. >> the people of thailand have been celebrating the 85th birthday of their king. he made a rare public appearance in bangkok before tens of thousands of well-wishers. in every speech, he appealed for unity and stability in the divided country. he has reigned for 66 years. >> a bush fire in australia has threatened homes in northern sydney. firefighters had contained the blaze, which caused traffic problems as thick smoke blew across the city. according to local media, officials believe t
, hitting the coastal city of ishinomaki. so far there are no reports of major injuries or damage. authorities lifted their warning and advisories two hours after the quake hit. this tremor struck in the early evening as people were heading home from work or getting ready to sit down for dinner. as we mentioned, spokespersons believe it was an aftershock of the march 11th earthquake. we felt the tremor here in tokyo. buildings swayed for a number of minutes. local authorities in north eastern japan say the earthquake caused limited damage. nhk has learned that ten people were injured in four prefectures, including miyagi and ibaraki. more than 5,000 residents in coastal areas of miyagi prefecture evacuated to higher ground out of concern over tsunami. 15 flights at sendai airport in the northeast were canceled because the airport is in the tsunami zone. two nuclear power plants that were damaged in last year's quake, including the fukushima daiichi plant, did not suffer any damage. the powerful earthquake prompted local authorities to call for the evacuation of coastal areas in fu
channel in the classroom." >> in "a tale of two cities," charles dickens wrote, "it was the best of times, it was the worst of times." he could have been describing middle school. no question, middle school can be a challenge, and the challenges are different for guys than they are for girls. this week, scott reports on surviving middle school from the boys' perspective. >> middle school is life-changing. >> middle school is competitive. >> annoying. >> confusing. >> it's stressful. >> middle school is a circus juggling act. >> those comments don't surprise dr. michael thompson, a psychologist and an author. he spent a lot of time studying the issues boys face in school. >> boys are not as wired as well for school as girls are. it's a harder fit for them, and it is right to middle school, because they're so much more physically active, they're so much more impulsive, and they want to be outside running around. >> and boys are more likely than girls to drop out before finishing high school. but schoolwork isn't the only challenge boys face in middle school. >> i really appreciate you comin
"teen kids news" on their big screen in times square, new york city. steves: from granada, it's a two-hour drive over the mountains and down into europe's fun-in-the-sun headquarters, the costa del sol. i find this strip of mediterranean coastline generally overbuilt and very commercialized. malaga, the major city of the coast, is a good place to pass through. and almost anything even resembling a quaint fishing village is long gone, replaced by time-share condos and golf courses. the big draw is the beaches. there are plenty of hotels, and sun worshipers enjoy themselves in spite of the congestion and lack of charm or local culture. nearly every country from europe's drizzly north tucks an expatriate community somewhere along this coast. they don't want to leave their culture, just their weather. my favorite costa del sol stop is the resort town of nerja. while capitalizing on the holiday culture, nerja has retained some of its charm. the church fronts the square, which fronts the beach, and everybody's out strolling, eventually winding up on the proud "balcony of europe" terrace. th
, cities stripped. at night, the sea, barbaric bellows stifled, sprawls outside the window, framed like a dark, unruly landscape. behind us is a darker kind of dark: i watch your eyes for signals. the music makes a pause for prophecy: 'tomorrow, off-shore breezes and warmth to each other's warmth,' we do not listen." >> that was how long ago? >> 1968. >> you had been married -- >> we had been married 18 years, at that point. >> how does love change from then to now? >> it's more profound and more essential. it was very strong right from the beginning. we met on the first day of french class at northwestern university in 1946. and we've been together ever since. >> she became a playwright, didn't she? >> she was a playwright. and her plays have been produced about 60 times in mostly new york and los angeles. and i appreciate her work on my poetry and other things i write. she is a wonderful critic. four years ago, she had a stroke. and that kind of put an end to her writing. so that was a very sad thrust. >> i'm curious as to this poem, "this year's valentine." where did that come from?
in oklahoma city. getting back to normal across the eastern seaboard. finally, let's go over to the european continent. lots of things are going on. frigid air is blanketing the north, producing snow showers for parts of the british isles, southern scandinavian peninsula. rain is intensifying over the iberian peninsula. storms affecting the central and east mediterranean because we have frigid air to the north colliding with warmer air from africa. severe weather will continue into your friday. temperatures are very chilly. only zero degrees in berlin. minus 1 in moscow. minus 2 in warsaw. 4 in paris. you may see snow showers on friday. here's the extended forecast. >>> that's all for this edition of "newsline." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. do stay with us.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11